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As often happens, I didn’t really have time to write this column. Maybe you don’t have time to read it.

Ironically, perhaps, I had wanted to do a reprise of the first column I wrote for The Aegis, about my skepticism of new technology and its promises of salvation.

That made me think about how little time all of us seem to have, for everything.

A lot of us are always rushing from one thing to the next, and there are never enough hours in the day for everything that needs to be done.

I’m sure if I Googled “time management,” there would be hundreds of books and articles on the topic, but who has time to read them?

It’s especially funny because all the new technology is supposed to save time, and make everything easier or more accessible.

Since I wrote that first column almost a year ago, there have been more and newer smartphones. The iPad, which is basically a flatter laptop, was released. Everyone (well, a lot of people) has flat screens, flashier gadgets and faster everything.

Yet no one seems to have any more time than they did a year ago, or 10 years ago.

I don’t want to speak for “today’s teenager,” since I’m not one, but it doesn’t look like all their new technology is buying them any more time, or making them use it more wisely, either.

If I had a dollar for every teenager I’ve seen almost walk into a pole or a Wawa door because her eyes were glued to a tiny keypad, I could have retired from journalism by now.

So if all this stuff isn’t buying us anything except distraction and a potential black eye, what good is it?

I remember during my freshman year of high school, my English teacher made one offhand comment, in a bitter-sounding tone: “As long as you live, time will always be the enemy.”

I remembered it because I immediately disagreed with it. I did not think time was just something to be fought, and I still don’t.

I will admit the industry I’m in is partly responsible.

As my editor Erika Butler wrote in her last column, everything in journalism is moving toward being up and running 24/7.

I think in addition to making journalists crazier and more time-starved, mentality makes you, the readers or viewers, often feel like you’re being barraged by news.

So two things seem clear to me: 1) The amount of time available isn’t going to change anytime soon (although the Japan earthquake did shift the earth off its axis a little, so we’ll see what effect that has), and 2) anything billed as a time-saving device is basically guaranteed to somehow make us busier.

If time isn’t planning to change, I guess that means we have to change, which is where it all hits the fan.

One of the people I admired most in college was the director of an extracurricular-type academic program in which I participated.

I worked for a while in the program’s office and often ran into that director, who, by the way, also worked in journalism.

She was the main person in charge of hundreds of students and a busy program, but she never acted the least bit frazzled or pressed for time.

I knew she got a lot of mail and visitors, but her things always looked neatly organized and she always seemed able to make time for people who dropped by.

I like to keep people like her in mind to remind myself that the feeling of “not having time” is, more often than not, all in your head.


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