Search the Baltimore County community newspaper archives


>> Click here to search for stories published AFTER 2011

>> Use this search box to find stories published prior to 2011.
Note: All Words is a more strict search. Implied operator is "AND."
Ex: Charles Dickens"

From
subscriber services email print comment


With commercials for the U.S. Census already in TV rotation since the Super Bowl, Harford County officials formally kicked off their local promotion of the 2010 census Monday.

April 1 is considered Census Day, when the county hopes residents will have completed and mailed the official questionnaire or have completed the questionnaire online.

Questionnaires will be mailed out between March 15 and 17, with reminders sent out about a week later.

It's estimated that Harford County has gained about 38,000 residents since the last census in 2000.

Besides being a constitutional mandate, the census affects the county's state and federal legislative districts, which will be revamped in 2011, as well as the amount of federal funding it receives, said County Executive David Craig during Monday's kickoff.

Craig said it is estimated that the county loses $700 for every person who is not counted.

"Anybody that has to operate a budget knows that federal funding is important," he said, alluding to the county's own recent budget struggles. "If we only had 99 percent of our people [count], we lose over $2 million in federal funding a year. That is important."

Many organizations and agencies also depend on census results, he said.

"That helps when we have to make decisions on where we place schools, where we place hospitals," he said.

During the 2000 census, the county was fourth in the state in the amount of forms turned in, with 75 percent of the population responding, Daniel Rooney, senior planner at the Department of Planning and Zoning, said.

"Our goal is to make Harford County number one in the mail-back response rate for 2010," he said.

"The census is a humongous undertaking," Rooney continued, estimating the county's current population to be about 246,000. "That's still a lot of people to count."

That is also an increase of about 12.5 percent since 2000, when there were about 218,590 people.

It would also mean Harford's growth slowed down after the 20 percent spurt between 1990 and 2000. The 1990 census showed 182,132 residents.

The county is promoting a much shorter version of the census questionnaire than residents are used to.

This year's census form has just 10 questions.

"When I saw this, my first thought was, the federal government is shortening the form and simplifying it. I thought, 'Wow, that's great, that will certainly make our job much easier,'" Rooney said, adding that the previous, long census form was hard to digest.

"It got more complicated and people were being more resistant," he said.

As for demographic changes since 2000, Rooney said he does not expect the county to have changed significantly.

Rooney said he does expect to see some increase in the number of minority populations, such as Asians and African-Americans, which reflects their increase in the nation as a whole.

For more information on all things census, go to http://2010.census.gov.


user comments (0)


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Baltimore Sun: Baltimore breaking news, sports, business, entertainment, weather and traffic
xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Learn more about subscriptions
Learn more about subscriptions
Advertisement
From the Terps overcoming costly penalties and mistakes to the defense delivering another strong performance, here are three takeaways from an eventful and unorthodox Friday night at Memorial Stadium.
Hoehn’s Bakery, a beloved Baltimore mainstay of nearly 95 years, announced it is shuttering its doors Friday.
In almost every game, the Chiefs are going to go on a scoring run and then turn their top pass rushers loose to seal the victory. That spells trouble for the Ravens, Mike Preston writes.
Maryland transitioned to cashless tolling in 2020. The rollout has been fraught with glitches, including overbilling customers, according to a state audit.
Advertisement
Jamerria Hall was charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of her 6-year-old daughter, Da’Neria Thomas, and 8-year-old son, Davin Thomas Jr., after the children were found dead inside their Southwest Baltimore apartment last month.
The Chiefs have become a nemesis reminiscent of a small club of past foes that thumped the Ravens year after year. With another matchup looming Sunday night, do they have the Ravens' number?
Drew S. Talbott, owner of a local construction company who was also a competitive Chesapeake Bay sailor, died of a heart attack Sept. 8. The longtime Anneslie resident was 58.
Donning neon vests and hard hats, construction crews and developers gathered Friday for a “topping out” ceremony at the site of what eventually will be Port Covington’s Rye Street Market, the first of five buildings currently underway on the waterfront campus to have its exterior shell completed.
The state has drafted new wastewater requirements for the Valley Proteins factory in Linkwood, and is planning to levy a “substanitial” financial penalty over pollution concerns.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Sunday Citizen compiled facts and statistics on how remote work has affected sleep using 2020 data from health news publications, scientific journals, and surveys that look into the effects of remote work on different aspects of life.
Unity Hall will offer “below-market rents” to nonprofit and community-based organizations for office and program spaces.
Carroll County Public Schools reported Friday that 803 close contact individuals are in quarantine because of possible COVID-19 exposure.
Restaurants across Baltimore and the nation have reported hiring woes amid competition for workers during the pandemic.
Shareholders of W. R. Grace & Co. approved a deal Friday for a New York building materials company to acquire the Columbia-based specialty chemicals giant for $4.6 billion.
After almost 45 years to the day that police found her body dumped near a cemetery, Baltimore County Police said detectives identified “Woodlawn Jane Doe” thanks to new DNA testing.
Advertisement

Free Fun & Games

  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Daily Crossword
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Jumble Daily in color
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Daily Solitaire
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Bubble Shooter HD
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    2020 Connect
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Cookie Crush
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Butterfly Kyodai
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Classic Mahjong
  • Picturing Maryland: A photo a day for 2021 part 3
    Daily Sudoku
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

The Baltimore Sun Store

Advertisement

GAMES & TRIVIA

Advertisement